Published by AView

LIBRARY OF NEWS

March 2012

Welcome to the LIBRARY OF NEWS - an ongoing project from AView.

000
GENERAL WORKS
100
PHILOSOPHY & PSYCHOLOGY
200
RELIGION
300
SOCIAL SCIENCES
400
LANGUAGE
8
17
5
441 (1°)
2





500
SCIENCE
600
TECHNOLOGY
700
ARTS & RECREATION
800
LITERATURE
900
HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY
12
39 (3°) 78 (2°) 5
6

 TENS:
 

320
POLITICS

141

360
SOCIAL SERVICES
122

330
ECONOMICS

77

790
RECREATION

62

300
SOCIOLOGY

38

340
LAW

36


610
MEDICINE

22
▲1 170
ETHICS

16
▼1 380
COMMUNICATIONS

15
NE 10°
620
ENGINEERING

9


Each day Ivan Methuselah and Aidan Ross receive a consignment of News Headlines in the form of the [[Channel 4 News]] Snowmail email.

These headlines are then meticulously catalogued according to Anglo-American rules by a team of untrained chipmunks who must assign to each story a reasonably appropriate library classification.

Once labeled, the news is added to our extensive shelving stack, and our card files are updated accordingly.

Running totals of our acquisitions are maintained against their classes and are listed in the tables at either side of this column.

For details of a similar project conducted by Ivan & Aidan over the course of 2011, see Ivan & Aidan's Racing News.

We hope the news makes for pleasant reading...

UNITS:


364
Criminology

58

327
Internat'l Relations

46

796
Outdoor Sports

45

363
Social Issues

37
▲1 324
Political Process

33
▼1 331
Labour Economics

27
▲2 303
Social Processes

21
▼1 320
Political Science

20
▼1 323
Political Rights

17

10° 362
Social Welfare

16
NE
10° 345
Criminal Law

16

APRIL

Some movement this month, though the same classes hold their places at the top of the tables. The 170s have gained a place thanks to the questions of ethics faced by Jeremy Hunt, and the 620s have replaced the 780s in the top 10 tens thanks mainly to a leaking gas rig. In the units we've three climbers to consider: elections both home and abroad gained 324 a place, while acts of terrorism and civil war (not least in Afghanistan and Syria) have bumped up 303 by two slots. At the bottom of the pile, 345 sneaked into joint-10th as extradition fever hit.

As we type, curious news comes to our attention: our old favourite from the Ration Book days, Roly Keating, has been poached from the BBC by the British Library. We are indeed trendsetters.


MARCH

March sees us with every hundred now represented, although the 300s remain well ahead of their rivals. There's no movement in the Tens, with the 320s remaining on top (327 provides the majority, with 324, 320 and 323 lending support, as illustrated by the expanded table). The highest Unit remains 364, all bar one of which continues within the ".1" Decimal. "International Relations" climbs two places thanks mostly to continuing international efforts with Syria and to the continuing problems posed by Afghanistan. "Outdoor Sports" is the only Unit in the top 10 that is not a 300. Such is the influence of Sport in our News.


FEBRUARY

February passes and we begin to see that the 300s are going to walk this as far as the Hundreds go. It's the Tens and Units where the racing is likely to occur. Syria's been the defining story of the month, but the approach we've taken in our classification is such that events there register as Political Process and International Relations rather than as Syria. In a library, of course, books describe events of the past, allowing revolutions and civil wars to fall more easily into the historical pile of the 900s than the sociological categories we've been using. Is it more important that this is a news story about Syria or that this is a news story about state terror? We've taken the opinion that the latter is the real guiding principle behind the story being newsworthy (notwithstanding a certain Arab Spring narrative), contrary to the geographical classification we employed during Racing News


JANUARY

January began with a glut of Crime stories hung over from the Festive Period. Then the main themes of the month began to bed in: Scottish Independence was the first bone to occupy the dogs of the metaphorical Fleet Street, before we were distracted by a sinking ship. But the biggest football was kicked off on the 8th of January with the story "Cameron backs curb on executive pay". Ten days later, to remind Dave who's in charge, Goldman Sachs were paying bonuses in spite of a profits slump. The government responded on the 23rd: "Cable unveils plans to curb executive pay". Four days later, RBS were offering a £1m bonus to their CEO. This, it is reasonable to say, gave the government a slightly eggy face, though after some backstage arm-twisting and Labour's demand for a parliamentary debate on the matter, Hester kindly declined his pressie. To top things off for the month, the powers that be stripped dear old Fred Goodwin of his knighthood: a sort of sacrificial rite of the kind where the lamb does not get killed so much as lightly sheared. "Too little too late" doesn't quite cover it, I suspect. Maybe we should've just killed Cedric Brown when we had the chance.

AView / A/V Woman